Posts Tagged ‘Kerala art’

Phantasms of the Real and Other: An Artistic Exploration by Seven Young Painters from Kerala

// October 27th, 2012 // No Comments » // Cultural Politics

Detail from “Spy” by Aneesh V. Acrylic on canvas 2012

This group show by upcoming young artists from Kerala titled Phantasm, How Real and Other is on at DH Art Centre Kochi from 27 to 31 October 2012.  Aneesh V from Kollam, Harikrishnan B from Trivandrum, Jos Martin L X from Kochi, Kiran Jacob from Kottayam, Remya R S from Trivandrum, Sandeep S Babu from Kottayam and Shyne K from Kottayam are showing their latest works in Acrylic and mixed media.  Some illuminating installations are also on show.

From Aneesh V’s Untitled Work. Water Color on Paper with LED lights 2012

This young group of artists explore the phantasms of the real and other in our contexts of visual realities.  They make visible the illusory and the volatile in our daily junctures and struggles of life and art.  The hyper realities and simulations of lived experiences and affects are also rendered on canvas by these inquisitive visual skeptics. The young artists keen sense of contemporary life and the world is remarkable and sophisticated in its visual dexterity.

“Survival Series” by Shyne K. Acrylic and charcoal on tea-wash paper 2012

Their sense of cultural traditions and critique of the past and the present seem to be futuristic. They are furthering the art and politics of representation in a tumultuous time in Kerala which is facing unprecedented socio economic and cultural changes especially in the contexts of economic and cultural globalizations, contemporary debates on development and environmental catastrophes.

Detail from Kiran Jacob’s work. Charcoal and Water Color on Paper 2012

The aesthetically nuanced works by Aneesh V , Jos Martin, Kiran Jacob, Remya R S and Shyne K are really moving and contemporary in its details and significations.  They are articulating and reflecting the complexity and dynamism of reality in a changing world from within the cultural choreography of Kerala.  It is interesting to see such young people creatively responding to the political and aesthetic transformation of their time in their intimate medium in charcoal, acrylic and mixed media.  Their touch of ingenuity and sensitivity to new micro political realities like ecology, gender, sexuality, region, religion  and caste are highly commendable.  I wish them all the very best in their future visual voyages.

ajay sekher  27 Oct 2012

From their catalog: Details of the young artists behind Phantasm

Tax and Cuts: Online Solo by Ajay Sekher

// August 20th, 2012 // 1 Comment » // Cultural Politics

Tax. Oil Pastel on paper. 12*10 cm. 2012

 

 

Fest. Oil Pastel on Paper. 12*10 cm. 2012

 

 

Epics. Oil Pastel on Paper. 12*10 cm. 2012

 

 

Slash. Oil Pastel on Paper. 12*10 cm. 2012.

 

 

Cut. Oil Pastel on Paper. 12*10 cm. 2012

 

This is my third solo-show and the first online exhibition of paintings and drawings that is available everywhere through the world wide web.  The first one  Dreams Deferred was in May 2010 at D H Art Centre, Kochi and the second one titled To Husain was at Kalarikal Art Gallery, Panampally Nagar, Kochi in July 2011.  I have also displayed my works for public view  in group shows in Trivandrum, Kottayam, Kochi and Thrissur from 2008 onwards.

The present and third online solo is titled Tax and Cuts and is an artistic response and resistance to the growing violence and aggression that are corrupting and demeaning persons, institutions, processes and greater political formations in Kerala today.  It is a symbolic gesture against the naked and abusive experience of tyranny and repressive regimes in constitutional public institutions and cultural spheres including the higher academia and media.

Personal experience of pro-fascist autocracy in public institutions and historical experience of cultural hegemony constitute the symbolic realm of this art-show. The body of work draws icons and visuals from the past and present.  It touches upon various crucial moments including the dehumanizing breast-tax in Kerala history to the shameful suppression of speech and expression in the current cultural conjecture.  If the imagery, genealogy and heterology of these works are provocative and shocking the contexts of barbarism needs to be blamed and changed.  It is an artistic and semiotic critique of Kerala culture, politics and society in a profoundly personal way.

ajay sekher